Posie's Blog. Tales of island life on a hebridean hill farm

Posie's Blog. Tales of island life on a hebridean hill farm

Monday, 20 August 2007

'Shocked'.....




We must have the most photographed cows on the island. There has been a steady stream of tourists stopping to take pictures of our girls on the hill. At this point I would like to take the opportunity to apologise to any of those ‘happy snappers’ who may be reading this and have had the misfortune to have got ever so slightly too close to those ladies and ended up getting a shock off the happy farmer’s electric fence.

I was sat having a coffee on the bench with the happy farmer when yet another car load of tourists stopped to take pictures and from the body language one had got a ‘bang’ off the fence. As the happy farmer chuckled away I remarked that we really must get some more signs put up to warn people. The happy farmer gave an ever so slightly unenthusiastic nod. You see I think the truth of the matter is he enjoys the daily entertainment as he sits sniggering into his coffee as yet another tourist gets a shock.

Of course our tourist business will be completely blown now I have let the cat out of the bag. The happy farmer on the other hand is keen to point out that if the tourists are guests of ours he always makes sure he warns them about his electric fence, pointing out the signs as he goes.

As I came off the hill last week, I was confronted with a backside sticking up in the air, head firmly under the tractor, swearing away. Unfortunately I didn’t have my camera at this point and decided against asking the said farmer if he would pose with his bottom sticking out of the tractor for a ‘pic’ for this blog, lest he began swearing at me too. The backside did not belong to the happy farmer you see, but as I recognised it I couldn’t resist giving it a good whack with the walking stick! It was another well known farmer, painting the air a very bright blue with his explosion of expletives. The problem…. his tractor had broken down, however very conveniently it happened beside the happy farmer’s reliable old lady, and I am talking tractors here and not farmer’s wives!!

He duly borrowed the happy farmer’s tractor, driving off down the road in a slightly better mood, having agreed to borrow it for a couple of days.

A week later he returned it, with a very sad story, his tractor was in need of major surgery. The happy farmer quickly ushered him in, handed him a beer, and has recommended the Samaritans phone number and an extra long stint at Sunday paper time in the local hostelry as a tried and tested cure.

Watch this space.

Until next time…

16 comments:

ChrisH said...

I'm with the happy farmer! In fact, having just returned from Cardigan where the tourists are all moving at 0 miles per hour along the high street, I might invest in a cattle prod to move them along a bit.

lampworkbeader said...

Why is it that 'Language' is an essential part of fixing a vehicle, be it a tractor, car or a bike.
Shame you didn't have the camera at the ready!

lampworkbeader said...

Just a small question. I hope it isn't too obvious but I really want to know. Are Highland cattle just decorative? I can't imagine them being milked and I've never seen any rare breed beef for sale as 'Highland Cattle'.

Pondside said...

So that's how you treat tourists on your island! I'd like to have an electric fence to keep the deer out, but I don't know if it would really work.
Too bad you missed a very good 'you tube' opportunity!

Preseli Mags said...

I bet that gave the tourists something to talk about at dinner parties! I'm with the happy farmer. Tourists need 'education' and they wouldn't read the signs - they would probably have to touch the fence anyway just to make sure the signs were correct!

countrymousie said...

Oh I would just adore some of those cattle. I might get some shocking fencing to keep those dreader hikers at bay! It will save chasing them on my mower

toady said...

Beautiful beasts - no wonder everyone wants a photo. Toady

Faith said...

Oh I'm disappointed you didnt get that bum shot!

FunkyMunky said...

Enjoyed reading this. Those cows are beautiful ... can I have them for my back garden? Why is it we never have a camera handy at the really good moments??

WesterWitch/Headmistress said...

There is a lone Highland Bull who attracts visitors to a woolen mill on the way into Callander. The owners have had to put double fencing around the bull to stop tourists from getting too close and being hurt by the bulls horns . . . .not that he is aggresive - far from it - simply that tourists can't work out that being too close to long sharp horns is dangerous . . .I feel rather sorry for the bull though he is all on his own - although he clearly enjoys the attention he gets from the tourists.

Crystal Jigsaw said...

The cows do look ever so pretty, it's no wonder folk want to take them home, in the form of a photo of course.

We have electric fences around here too but as yet I've never heard of any shocks! Perhaps I should take the signs away and get out my camera!

Crystal xx

Suffolkmum said...

I'm a fan of those cows too. My daughter, for some truly bizarre reason, (we don't have many cows in Suffolk) has become obsessed with highland cattle and keeps making mooing noises and pretending to be one! Very strange, I know. Must keep her away from electric fences!

snailbeachshepherdess said...

There is a herd of Highland Cattle on the A5 on the way to Oswestry that is a traffic stopper! cameras clicking away ..never mind the queue! They do look beautiful though and the calves are just gorgeous. I presume they must be a beef breed ..never heard of anyone milking them?

laurie said...

isn't it funny that we tourists (and i hasten to say i have never trespassed on your land and gotten shocked) will photograph just about anything? oh look a COW!

i have been known to take pictures of cows in wisconsin, which are not very glamorous at all.

but when you're on the road, everything seems more interesting than at home.

elizabethm said...

for some reason I haven't seen your blogs for ages and was lovely to catch up again. hope tractors are fixed, cottages full, cows all behing their fences and all pigs fed and ready to fly. we have had some awful weather but lovely here today when was dreadful in london so i am persuading myself there will be an indian summer to come.

@themill said...

You live my life!